What Is Strong? Real World Strength Standards For Raw, Natural Lifters

What is strong? I've analyzed the national records for several major drug-free powerlifting federations, and compiled my own set of raw strength standards.

What is strong? We live in a world filled with 1000 pound squat and 800 pound bench press Youtube videos. Kind of makes you feel weak, doesn't it? It sure makes me feel weak. There are a couple of key things you need to know about most of these lifts.

1000 Pound Squats and 800 Pound Bench Presses?

Strength StandardsHow are these guys able to move Herculean amounts of weight? Here are 2 major reasons.

#1 - Training Gear. The guys putting up these monster numbers are for the most part using training gear. What is training gear? Training gear includes the use of specialized squat suits and bench shirts that are designed to help powerlifters add hundreds of pounds to each lift.

So when you see a guy benching close to 800 pounds with a bench shirt on, there's a good chance he "only" benches 500 without a bench shirt. The same goes for squats suits. A squat of over 700 without a squat suit is fairly rare. Add in a squat suit, along with knee wraps and squat briefs, which go under a squat suit to help move even more weight, and these guys are squatting over 1000 pounds.

Training gear is not magical though. It requires an amazing amount of dedication and practice, and few can master it.

#2 - Drugs. Another factor adding to these monster totals is an obvious one - steroid and human growth hormone usage. Now it is certainly not my intention to label everyone with a big lift as a drug user. I've seen some pretty staggering natural lifts in my day. With that said, drug use is fairly common in the sport of powerlifting, and I'm not going to lie to you and pretend it's not.

There are some natural-only federations. Outside of this realm, your guess is as good as mine as to who is clean and who isn't.

Anti-Gear, Anti-Steroids?

Before we move on any further, I want to make something very clear. The point of this article isn't to bash lifters who use training gear or drugs. This article exists to provide natural and raw strength standards to lifters who will never use either. Period, end of story. I respect the iron, and the men and women who move it, and am not here to judge or stir up debates.

Raw, Natural Strength Standards

Let's dive into the topic of raw, natural strength standards by analyzing the national records of several drug-free powerlifting federations. Some of these federations are large, and some modest in size.

  • 100% Raw
  • NASA
  • UPA-AD

These numbers will give you somewhat of a reasonable look at "elite" strength levels. They are not meant to be elite standards in and of themselves. I will make an attempt to define my opinion of elite standards later on.

National Raw Records for Men
Weight Class USAPL 100% Raw NASA ADFPF UPA-AD
 132  479.50  530.90  275.58  247.50  None
 148  473.75  550.90  473.99  445.50  220
 165  534.50  530  512.57  447.70  529
 181  562  601.10  540.13  500.50  529
 198  573  610  644.85  550  600
 220  650.25  650.30  699.96  583  633
 242  705.25  700.70  650.36  621.50  705
 275  766  850  755.08  599.50  640
 308  854.25  826.70  766.10  599.50  704
Bench Press
National Raw Records for Men
Weight Class USAPL 100% Raw NASA ADFPF UPA-AD
 132  314  330.40  231.48  187  None
 148  337.25  360.40  294.31  302.50  165
 165  402.25  400  363.76  374  314
 181  385.75  385  363.76  385  364
 198  443  425  418.87  374  412
 220  523.50  490  451.94  423.50  425
 242  462.75  485.60  415.57  451  457
 275  501.50  585  507.06  511.50  440
 308  546.50  520  476.19  484  501
National Raw Records for Men
Weight Class USAPL 100% Raw NASA ADFPF UPA-AD
 132  578.50  450  358.25  341  None
 148  523.50  540  567.68  473  353
 165  661.25  630  567.68  535.70  567
 181  677.75  641.10  617.29  638  600
 198  706.50  661.30  661.38  671  630
 220  727.50  672.40  677.91  654.50  677
 242  699.75  760.50  722.01  704  645
 275  832.00  800  705.47  632.50  650
 308  843.25  760.50  810.19  665.50  744

So, what do these numbers tell us? The first thing I noticed is that the following lifts are extremely hard to achieve:

  • Squat - 600 pounds
  • Bench Press - 400 pounds
  • Deadlift - 650 pounds

It's safe to say that if you hit these numbers, you're well into Elite territory for a raw, natural lifter. It should also be noted that it is darn near impossible to hit a 2000 raw, natural powerlifting total. Only a small handful of natural lifters have performed this amazing feat.

Strength Standards

The lifting standards I am about to present are merely guidelines. Use them to assess your progress, and potential for future gains. Don't be discouraged by the numbers of the top one percent of lifters. You can make amazing strides forward without having the best genetics, so remain patient and train smart. If you do so you will exceed your expectations.

Before I move forward, here are some simple definitions for standards names.

  • Pro Strength - The very best of the best. Superhuman. Supreme strength.
  • Elite Strength - You should be extremely competitive at a National level powerlifting meet.
  • Extremely Strong - You will be one of the top lifters at most local, natural powerlifting meets. Your strength levels land you in the top 1% of humanity.
  • Very Strong - In the muscle building and strength training realm, this would be considered intermediate level strength.
  • Strong - Your lifts are around a 200 raw bench, 300 raw squat and 400 raw deadlift. This doesn't seem strong compared to powerlifting records, but you are still stronger than 90% of men walking the earth.

Raw Natural Strength Standards Based On Weight - Men

Pro Natural Raw Strength Standards
Men - By Weight
Weight Squats Bench Deadlifts
 132  430  270  440
 148  460  300  470
 165  500  330  540
 181  540  350  580
 198  570  380  610
 220  610  410  640
 242  640  430  660
 275  670  450  680
 308  700  470  700
Elite Natural Raw Strength Standards
Men - By Weight
Weight Squats Bench Deadlifts
 132  400  250  410
 148  425  280  435
 165  465  305  500
 181  500  325  535
 198  530  350  565
 220  565  380  595
 242  595  400  610
 275  620  420  630
 308  650  435  650
Extremely Strong Natural Raw Strength Standards
Men - By Weight
Weight Squats Bench Deadlifts
 132  325  205  330
 148  345  225  355
 165  375  250  405
 181  405  265  435
 198  430  285  460
 220  460  310  480
 242  480  325  495
 275  505  340  510
 308  525  355  525
Very Strong Natural Raw Strength Standards
Men - By Weight
Weight Squats Bench Deadlifts
 132  290  185  300
 148  310  210  320
 165  340  225  365
 181  365  240  395
 198  385  260  415
 220  415  280  435
 242  435  290  445
 275  455  305  460
 308  475  320  475
Strong Natural Raw Strength Standards
Men - By Weight
Weight Squats Bench Deadlifts
 132  250  155  255
 148  265  175  270
 165  290  190  310
 181  310  205  335
 198  330  220  350
 220  350  235  370
 242  370  250  380
 275  385  260  390
 308  405  270  405

I used the following multipliers to determine these numbers:

  • Elite = Pro x 92.5%
  • Extremely Strong = Pro x 75%
  • Very Strong = Pro x 67.5%
  • Strong = Pro x 57.5%

Strength Standards

The Last Word on Natural Strength

Most of you aren't competitive powerlifters, nor do most of you have the goal of weighing 270 pounds or more. So with that in mind, I want to end by presenting you with an easy set of natural strength standards to remember.

The following goals are perfect for the lifter who wants to get big and strong, but who may never have any interesting in competing in bodybuilding or powerlifting. Reach these goals while focusing on conventional hypertrophy (muscle building) rep ranges, and you will not only add muscle to your frame, but also have the power and strength to back it up.

  • Bench Press - 300 pounds
  • Squats - 400 pounds
  • Deadlift - 500 pounds
  • Power Clean - 225 pounds
  • Overhead Press - 225 pounds
  • Barbell Row - 300 Pounds

There have been fewer than 85 men who have ever hit a 2000 raw powerlifting total. Of these men, only a very small handful accomplished this feat while competing in major drug-tested federations. I hope this helps put powerlifting numbers in perspective.

The use of bench shirts, squat suits, steroids and growth hormone has made it difficult for most natural athletes to understand just what strong means. I see far too many strong forum lifters refer to themselves as weak, simply because they do not understand what reasonable natural standards are. They talk themselves out of competitive powerlifting because of a misguided vision that everyone is putting up 2000 pound totals. Not true at all.

A 1200 pound 3-lift total (bench press, squats and deadlifts) is more than 95% of gym rats will ever accomplish. A 1500 pound 3-lift total is a huge accomplishment, and will be hard to beat at most local, natural powerlifting meets.

For those of you who are doubting this, let me leave you with some numbers from my first powerlifting experience. In 2011 I competed at a local ADFPF meet. This was my first competition and I had no idea what to expect. I certainly had no clue that I would be the strongest lifter at the meet. My 3-lift total was 1501 that day. The second best total was approximately 200 pounds below this level.

This reveals that a 1300-1500 pound total at most local, raw and natural powerlifting meets is fairly impressive. Those that achieve these levels usually move on to national-level competitions.

I currently hold 2 national-level deadlifting records, one in the ADFPF, and one in the UPA. Certainly not a legendary achievement (far from it), but my records do provide further evidence that a 1500-1600 pound total is noteworthy in the natural lifting world.

Did this article help? Let me know in the comments. I would also like to know where your strength levels currently are, and what natural goals you are after. Good luck, and smash PRs!

About The Author
Muscle & Strength's Content Team is a group of fitness industry experts dedicated to publishing the highest quality articles, workouts and guides on the M&S Website.

105 Comments+ Post Comment

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 10/04/2015 - 08:24
Wade Race

I do mostly calisthenics, but my best gym lifts are
Bench press 225 x 1
Deadlift 430 x 1 Rack 405 x 8
Squat 350 x 2
Clean and Press 180 x 1
BB Row 245 x 8
I've gotten better results with progressive calisthenics, but I still love to deadlift!

No Profile Pic
Posted Thu, 09/24/2015 - 01:32

I have been on and off with the gym since high school but this summer I have been pretty consistent with my workouts.

I was always told I was strong for my size but i never realized how strong because I would always compare myself to my friends who are all 200lb+ individuals.
I did not realize how strong I was until doing some research.

The internet has so many different figures so I do not know which ones to go by. According to your numbers I am in the "Pro Strength" category for bench. I weigh 132lbs and can bench around 280+ (I injured my right leg in high school and my back in the beginning of the year so I stay away from S's or DL's)

I am looking to compete for the fun of the sport plus I feel like it would be a great motivator However, I do not want to go out looking like a fool. If most lifters in the 132 lb class are like Eric Head I do not stand a chance.

No Profile Pic
Posted Mon, 08/24/2015 - 11:19

I like these charts, but sometimes I wish that there were strength charts that factored overall skeletal frame size/height into the equation. In other words, take for example someone who is 5'10" 132 lbs vs 5'2 at the same weight. More than likely, the shorter person is going to have bigger muscles than the taller person, which (I would think) would make it much easier to gain strength. Essentially, it seems to me like those who with a low BMI are at a serious disadvantage.

No Profile Pic
Posted Thu, 06/25/2015 - 11:25

I weight 120 lbs (54 kg)
l have max lifts of a 365 lbs deadlift, 335 lbs back squat, 165 lbs bench, 140 lbs overhead press and 260 lbs front squat. I also sled dragged 1200 lbs as my heaviest pull cause I do alot of strongman. This is good????? This makes me extremely strong for my body-weight

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 06/24/2015 - 12:18

Nice Numbers

@Sarah Goodwich... Nice replies :D BTW any books or article you suggest for proper lifting for all natural heavy lifters...

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 06/23/2015 - 16:49
James Moody

I will be 61 in Aug. Just competed at a NASA meet in Dallas June 21st. BWT 242. Best lifts; curl - 148, squat - 325, bench - 303 and dead lift - 342. I am a rare bird,the 3 big lifts are all in the 300s.But I do have fun.I thought this writeup was good.It is hard to put lifting in a box,not only a body weight factor but age as well.Also have been drug free for life.

No Profile Pic
Posted Sat, 05/30/2015 - 01:00

I've been training for about 5 years. weigh about 230lb. I can bench 405, squat and deadlift 550lbs. all natural. my goal is to lift 2x my weight In bench and 3x my weight in squat and deadlift. all I can say is always push yourself and keep trying to beat your personal best not someone else.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 04/28/2015 - 13:31
Sarah Goodwich

I have to ask how many of these "natural" lifters are really natural; it's easy to beat drug-tests, and these numbers seem rather high even for natural standards.
Also, it's easy to "cheat" lifts when not done strictly according to rules, so I'd consider the LOWEST figure in each category to be the ACTUAL record, since the only reason one would be higher than another is that they didn't use the same rules.

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 06/10/2015 - 14:53

Hello Miss,

I have a question! I bench 865lbs, deadlift 650lbs ( why is it so much lower than my bench :( ) and squat 500lbs ( its okay though, because only loosers have a heavy squat, I usually just curlz on the rack :p) but i can only strict press 185 for 2 reps! WHY??? Also, I'm only 14 years old, I've never used steroids and only weight 175lbs. Please help me, I don't know if I'm strong or weak :(? Can someone reply and boost my ego with "wow your'e so strong BIlly" ty :* Oh and sorry I cant post a video :( I don't have enough money for a camera and don't know how to use editing programs, But I can post a training log for all my fans who think I'm strong :) I also don't know how to take pictures :s sorry

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 04/22/2015 - 17:20

wow....some of these numbers are staggering.

i can do over 370lb Dead lift 9 i weigh 75kg..165lb)

But i can't get my squat up. Stuck on about 250lbs for 6 months+ i try but my knees just don't have the strength.

What's the best way to increase the weights? i have read so many different methods

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 04/28/2015 - 13:43
Sarah Goodwich

There are two kinds of strength you want to look at: eccentric and concentric.
Eccentric (negative) strength is the most you can lower in a controlled motion, while concentric strength is the most you can raise. Eccentric strength reflects the mechanical capacity of your muscles, so if this is close to your concentric max then you need to work on increasing your muscle-mass by doing sets of repetitions with about 80% of your one-rep maximum.
Meanwhile if your max lift is a good deal lower than your eccentric max, then you're not using your muscles to capacity, and you need to increase it by plyometric exercises.
Contrary to popular belief, muscles are machines just like any other kind, and they have their limits; we often hear of "feats of amazing strength" during "emergencies" etc, leading to the impression that there's some mystical force that breaks normal barriers of physics; but in reality these are exaggerations and urban-legends which typically don't even come close to actual world records for an actual weightlifter of that size.
This bit of knowledge protects weightlifters from unrealistic expectations that they just need to "work harder" and they'll become superhuman, when in reality no human has ever done it.

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 03/20/2015 - 11:01

Hi excuse me if this sounds like a noob question but are the above numbers for 1 rep?

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 04/28/2015 - 13:57
Sarah Goodwich

Yes. ALL max-lifts are 1-rep.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/25/2014 - 12:28

I'm so confused. I am 5'8" and 148 pounds and have been lifting bench for about 5 months and started deadlifts 3 weeks ago. I bench 225 and deadlift 365, do I have good genes ? Is this normal? Is it below average ? I read stuff that makes it seem good but that seems dumb to me.

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 11/30/2014 - 16:53

148? You are gifted - or you're making things up and counting incomplete ROM that would get red lighted at a meet.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 04/28/2015 - 13:50
Sarah Goodwich

I have to agree that some of these claims sound unlikely for natural lifters, and point to improper lifting for ego-trips. .which become very expensive later on. A lifter who claims to be 208# but benching 430# would normally be a record, so the absence of his name on a record-book indicates that it owes its legitimacy to fiction, improper form or drugs.

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 11/12/2014 - 22:50

Great article. My lifting partner and I where talking about this in the last week. I am 36 5"8 208#s Benching around 360 squating 410 deadlift @ 400. My partner is about the same but taller and benching 430#s. We are trying to up the dead lift and squats but it is not working well. I was wondering if most of the plans out there are developed for the athlete on juice or not. What is your opinion on how often one should go heavy on deads and squats being natural? We just went back on 5-3-1 because the 95% of max every week we where doing was really starting to hurt & with little gains. Some plans out there say to do close to max more than once a week and I was wondering if this is with recovery help or not.

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 06/14/2015 - 19:31

There is a workout out there that I cant remember the name of that worked wonders for me. Find your 5 rep max. Drop it 90 lbs. So lets say you squat 365x5. Your first workout would be 275 for 1 set of 20. Just one set. Go up 5 lbs every workout. 3 workouts a week for 6 weeks and by the end you will be getting 365 for 20 instead of 5. It sounded crazy to me too but I gave it a shot. I have about 5 years of experience lifting and my 1 rep max went up from 455 to 525 in 6 weeks because of this workout. It feels like death though.

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 11/12/2014 - 02:36
Alfred MacDonald

Hey Steve,

I'm guessing you eyeballed figures like "90% of men" and "1% of humanity", but absolute bench #s for men have been compiled into percentiles before. top 10% starts at 191, and top 5% starts at 203. The top 1% isn't specified, but the SD is 35, so based on this I'd peg top 1% at 228. That doesn't seem like a lot to gym people, but that's because gyms select for such a biased sample. 280 bench press would probably be top 0.1%.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 15:27

I hit a 160kg (352lb) deadlift at a BW of 67kg (147lb) after almost exactly one year of training training. Without using straps, belt or a suit.
You have no idea how much my ego is enjoying this article at the moment, cheers!

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 15:03

Why is the deadlift listed so close to the squat?

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 11/30/2014 - 16:58

Because for most people, they tend to be that way. While the primary movers are different, in a powerlifting LBBS it is more hip dominant, much like the deadlift.

People who specialize are the ones who tend to have one markedly higher than the other. If you look up stats you will find a great deal of lifters who have higher squats then deadlifts.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 10:40

What if you are under 132 pounds

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 10:38

What if you are lower than 132lbs though and have hit the extremely strong standards

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 09:54
Jim Giant

Seems to me that the squat and deadlift are too close together for the "weaker" categories. Using a multiplier of pro standards to derive the rest is a bit over simplistic.

Apart from that I agree with everything you said.

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 11/11/2014 - 08:42

What is it with the red arrows on every comment ??????

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 11/02/2014 - 17:43
william goff

I am 5'9" 210 my bench is 440 my squat is 635 but deadlift is slacking at 500 any tips on lifting

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 04/28/2015 - 13:56
Sarah Goodwich

Stop lying to yourself. Deadlifting is simply harder to add lbs. by using improper form, and those numbers for the other lifts are clearly too high to square up with it. The numbers I've seen claimed from improper lift are amazing, often involving a 2-inch ROM and breaking every regulation for the lift in question, just so they can say they did it. And the almost universal complaint is "I can bench 500 lbs. but my deadlift is only 400," i.e. it's because deadlifting is the one lift that you can't B.S. yourself with.

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 10/03/2014 - 20:11

Bench 450, squat, 600, deadlift, 525

No Profile Pic
Posted Thu, 09/25/2014 - 12:17

Is it possible or advisable for a 49 year old to start pursuing these numbers in any category? I'm 175 pounds and my current numbers are about 225 x 5 for squat, bench and deadlift. My squat and deadlift went down due to a shoulder injury which is now repaired and healed well. I'm working on getting those numbers up to be in line with my bench.

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 09/24/2014 - 21:05

Probably one of the best articles I've read in a long while. This should be front page news in fitness circles. It is the one thing I keep going back to as everything seems to dance around or just graze the concepts in this article. West Side Barbell should be a throwback to 60s steroid mentality and will, indeed, seem cast in a shadow (not in a good way) as soon as somebody (somebody!) finally merges these various raw powerlifting categories and simplifies things, packages it and puts the term powerlifting in the layman's vernacular. A random Olympic-style drug testing Powerlifting Federation with a solid brand, without all the 3 feet off the bench presses, the suits, and the oddities, will, like CrossFit, be the next paradigm shift for fitness. Powerlifting is the one last dark corner of fitness and will be the next thing to suddenly resonate with thousands of "regular" people once the mystery of it is dusted off, cleaned up and presented by the right person. A house divided can't stand. It's a great sport and the article highlights what matters and lends, for once, a balanced perspective and is very transparent. Now, if we can just take those 5 or so large organizations and let them work out their differences and come to an agreement.....then, like CART/IndyCar finally merging, good things will happen. This will be the next thing and I wish it would happen soon.

Steven's picture
Posted Wed, 09/24/2014 - 21:53


No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 08/17/2014 - 20:38

I feel great reading this article. I have got 500lbs on bench press once and I don't take any types of drugs or enhancers. I weighed about 315 or 320 when I got 500lbs. I was only working out about once or twice a week.. I have a YouTube video too, but all I do is raw and natural.. Check out my videos and let me know what y'all think. Go on YouTube and type Victor Milliner. I have about 3or 4 on there.. Thanks.

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 08/08/2014 - 16:14

great information

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 07/25/2014 - 10:01
Justin Currier

Bench shirts are for those who sit when they pee. Be a man use only your body id much rather rep 225 lbs 40 times cclean the use a flamboyant shirt to boost my ego. Wearing anything to help you add weight is a contradiction to strength training dont be a bitch do Olympic lifts raw.

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 07/23/2014 - 15:02

Deadlift seems really low but the other numbers sound about right. I could deadlift 400 pounds my freshman year of high school and then I couldn't even squat 350 pounds yet

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 07/18/2014 - 08:34

Great article!

No Profile Pic
Posted Mon, 06/23/2014 - 22:56
Terry Booth

I'm 65 years old. When I was in my mid forties, I could bench (all natural) 650 lbs. I then weighed 187 lbs at 5'6". I had no idea that lift would be considered a "pro" lift - possibly a world record. I knew I was stronger than most people my size, and I'm still much stronger than most men at my age. I'm not in the supreme shape I was then, and I don't work out much, but I did go to a gym last week to see what I could still lift. I could bench 300 lbs, 12 reps with no problem. I didn't even try to do more. I wonder what I could do if I worked out for a while?

No Profile Pic
Posted Sun, 06/15/2014 - 07:22

Are the above lift numbers 1 rep max lifts or actual workout numbers.
If the latter then how many reps and sets.

No Profile Pic
Posted Thu, 06/05/2014 - 19:31

Wow, Steve, what a great article! Thanks so much. After spending much of the past year or two doing tons of pull ups, dips, various pushups, neck bridges, and running hills, I've just started (two weeks ago) a powerlifting program. Though I've lifted a bit in the past, I am, by any reasonable definition, a near total beginner. My focus right now is simply to learn to lift correctly, without injury, and I know the gains will come as they come. Thanks for the reminder that I'm only competing with myself. I haven't been this excited about working out in a long time. I'm almost 49 and weigh 173 lbs. I think a total of 900 lbs is a very do-able 6 months goal. Keep you posted...

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 05/16/2014 - 01:41

I'm 120 lbs, I can deadlift 305 lbs, squat 315 lbs, and 405 lbs on 21" particle deadlifts for 7 reps. What category do I fall in?

No Profile Pic
Posted Sat, 05/10/2014 - 23:09
Joe beers

Great stuff Steve. Much respect to all the natural guys out there that put the true work in. I'm an old school guy who is all natural and I am very strict with my form. All the way down all the way up and no bounce. I weigh 225 and have squatted 500 x2 reverse bench 365 x2 and dead lift 455 x 6. No wraps or belt. Also like barbell curls 225 x 4.

No Profile Pic
Posted Thu, 05/01/2014 - 21:59

I am in the 148 weight class and max on bench press at 305, but my squat is only 325 and power clean is 210 how can I improve?

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 04/09/2014 - 19:00

Im 16 years old. My weight ranges from about 285 to about 290. Today i reached a milestone of 500 poundon squat. My bench press max is 320 and deadlift a solid 500 also. I would swear to the bible i have never done any performance enhancing drug. Where do i stand in teenage lifters that weigh about the same as me?

No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 06/10/2015 - 14:45
no one cares

im sorry to be the bearer of bad news. But... no one cares :( Your on an internet form ffs, and commenting anonymous. I gues fake attention is better than no attention eh?


No Profile Pic
Posted Wed, 04/09/2014 - 05:46

weighted dips done wide with shitloads of weight will build up your bench press 1st set aim for seven reps than 5,6 the 3,4 when u hit 7 up the weight next workout.i was 23 dipping 150 pound plus me 100kg.bench got to 350 squat 400 only been doing legs around a year, and could deadlift 500+pounds easy I did 3 sets at 200kg 6-8 reps all the time and I was 100% natural all the ppl at the gym thought I was on roids and would talk shit behind my back could of done real good was just about to enter my 1st powerlifting comp and I came off my bike and smashed my arm to bits I can never compete again not even train heavy ppl be safe

No Profile Pic
Posted Tue, 03/25/2014 - 05:26

im 19years old 6'3 280 and i play college football. after football i would like to get into powerlifting because its always intrigued me. bench 450. squat 520. deadlift 605.bench on a pause rep is only 405 tho. i take preworkouts and protein but thats it. my questions are how well would i place considering each lift will probably be less at a meet and 2 how do you even sign up for powerlifting meets? i live in california

No Profile Pic
Posted Fri, 03/21/2014 - 17:54
steve calande

I have a 15 year old football player who weighs about 165-175 lbs. He fluctuates around the 1100-1200 lb total. I would be interested in comparisons to current top adult lifters- what were they doing when they were 15 at a similar body weight? We squat deep, we do not pause the bench on the chest.

No Profile Pic
Posted Sat, 03/01/2014 - 21:13

Sweet I'm Elite! 580 Squat 350 Press 350 Clean With A 475 DeaLift And Climbing At 155 lbs

No Profile Pic
Posted Sat, 03/01/2014 - 15:06
George Bogdan

Interesting Read. But I don't know ... I mean I want to Believe IT but I don't know... I have been training for 7 months or so and According to this I am already Extremely Strong at a BW of 170LBS? my lifts being slightly 5/10 LBS in SQ and BP over 165BW category for this Extremely Strong Stage. With a Total of something a bit above 1000LBS + 1040/50 or so I will say I did not do all 3 lifts in one day/session , I am talking on different days chest/back/legs days. But HMM still I just don't know to believe it that in 7 months I went from Weak to Extremely Strong , HMM on the other hand I must be some sort of genetic freaks lol ?