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8 Week Novice Quick Start Workout

8 Week Novice Quick Start Workout Plan

Average: 4.1 (60 votes)
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New to lifting? Start here. This is a novice quick start guide that will move you from day 1 to day 60, providing you with specific advice and workouts.

Workout Summary

Main Goal:
Build Muscle
Workout Type:
Full Body
Training Level:
Beginner
Days Per Week:
3
Equipment Required:
Barbell, Bodyweight, Cables, Dumbbells, Machines
Target Gender:
Male
Author:

Workout Description

Quick Jump to the Workouts:

If you never really lifted seriously a day in your life, then start here. This is a novice quick start guide that will move you from day 1 to day 60, providing you with specific advice and workouts. A novice is a "rank beginner". Novice lifters are unfamiliar with the basic muscle building exercises and will not know their way around a weight room very well.

Getting Started - The Fundamentals

As a novice the first thing you need to understand is this: muscle building is not a sprint. Do not rush into things, trying to force growth by adding volume, or by switching to some complex workout system. Right now you need one thing: to get strong on the basic, compound exercises. When you learn a new sport you must master the fundamentals. Weight training is no different. You must take time to study and practice proper form on the major exercises.

Understand that no one ever masters exercise form. Adding weight to the bar will always make keeping proper form more challenging. The point in all this is simple - never stop trying to improve your exercise form. This will minimize injuries and help you reach your goals more quickly.

Before You Try to Get Stronger and Build Muscle

We have stressed the importance of learning good exercise form, but there are 2 more things that are requirements before you start tearing it up in the gym:

  1. Improved Conditioning
  2. Muscle Stability

Conditioning. Improving your conditioning simply means getting used to the basic demands of a specific type of exercise. Instead of hitting the gym today "guns blazing", trying to destroy your muscles, it's best to take the next two months and build up your conditioning, or ability to handle hard workouts. This is not something you will have to worry about. This article presents you with specific workouts designed to walk you step by step through the conditioning process. So, simply follow the listed workouts below and you're all set.

Stability. The first time you bench press or squat you're going to notice something funny - you feel shaky and unbalanced. There are several reasons for this:

  1. You are weak and out of shape.
  2. Your small muscles, or stabilizer muscles, are also very weak.
  3. When you haven't lifted weights you are only capable of activating a certain amount of muscle fibers.

Point 3 here is key. You need a period of time to allow for neuromuscular adaptation. Your central nervous system, or CNS, is like your hard wiring. When you lift weights it sends signals from the brain to a muscle, telling it to activate. When you first start lifting your body will not be maximally efficient at calling into play as many muscle fibers as possible. Why? For the same reason you don't get 20 inch arms after your first bicep workout. The human body requires a consistent and taxing outside force for it to have a reason to make substantial adaptations. The point in all this is:

Don't rush into trying to add weight to the bar before you understand the basics of form, build up your conditioning, and allow for a period of neuromuscular adaptation.

Now, on to the workouts...

Novice Workout, Weeks 1-2

For the first 2 weeks you will be lifting twice a week. No more and no less. If you can't make it to the gym for these workouts, you might want to look in the mirror and ask yourself if muscle building is something you really want. Do not miss workouts. If you want to be successful find a way to get it done. These are going to be "play workouts". Your goals during the first 2 weeks are:

  1. Find an appropriate amount of weight to use for each exercise.
  2. Practice form without the burden of heavy weight.
  3. Develop the routine of going to the gym and following a plan.
  4. Build up a small amount of conditioning.

Weight. Take time with each exercise and find a weight you would consider light. This amount of weight should not feel challenging, and you should be able to complete each set without feeling like the last few reps are impossible.

Form. Get the feel for each exercise, trying to make it as natural and comfortable as possible. If anything feels too awkward or even slightly painful, do some research to see if you're performing the exercise incorrectly.

Habit. Don't worry about moving mountains. Get to the gym on time, do the work and don't pressure yourself to be superhuman. Dedication is half the battle. Take pride in being consistent.

Conditioning. These workouts will start slow and build. Don't feel like they are ineffective or a waste of time. They are a necessary part of the process. You will be going hardcore soon enough. Remain patient.

Workout Schedule, Weeks 1-2

  • Monday - Workout
  • Tuesday - Rest
  • Wednesday - Rest
  • Thursday - Workout
  • Friday - Rest
  • Saturday - Rest
  • Sunday - Rest

Exercise List, Weeks 1-2

Perform the follow exercises in the order listed. Make sure to use a non-taxing weight. If you go too heavy for a set, back off the weight and try another set. Practice your form and take your time.

Weeks 1-2
Full Body
Exercise Sets Reps
Squat 2 12
Bench Press 2 12
Deadlift 2 12
Military Press 2 12
Barbell Row 2 12
Cable Tricep Extension 2 12
Lat Pull Down To Chest 2 12
Barbell Curl 2 12
Seated Calf Raise 2 12
Sit Ups 2 12

Cable tricep extensions and lat pulldowns might look out of place in this structure. They will be used during the first 4 weeks to build up some basic arm conditioning. During Weeks 5-8 you will be attempting dips and pullups.

Novice Workout, Weeks 3-4

During weeks 3 and 4 you will be increasing your training frequency to 3 times per week. Workouts will remain the same. Continue to use an appropriate, moderately-light weight; not challenging to the point where you are struggling to complete a set. Remain patient. You will begin to add weight during weeks 5-8.

Workout Schedule Week 3-4

  • Monday – Workout
  • Tuesday – Rest
  • Wednesday – Workout
  • Thursday – Rest
  • Friday – Workout
  • Saturday – Rest
  • Sunday – Rest

Exercise List, Weeks 3-4

Perform the follow exercises in the order listed. Continue to practice your form. Take time each week to study videos and articles that address good form, especially for the squat, bench press and deadlift.

Weeks 3-4
Full Body
Exercise Sets Reps
Squat 2 12
Bench Press 2 12
Deadlift 2 12
Military Press 2 12
Barbell Row 2 12
Cable Tricep Extension 2 12
Lat Pull Down To Chest 2 12
Barbell Curl 2 12
Seated Calf Raise 2 12
Sit Ups 2 12

Novice Workout, Weeks 5-8

During weeks 5 through 8 you are going to slowly add weight to each exercise until you feel like you could barely complete a set. When you do reach this point, continue to use this weight through the end of week 8. The point isn't to train to failure, but rather to learn about what you can handle for each movement for the given set and rep scheme. You will be learning more about your body and capabilities.

Squats and Deadlifts. For squats and deadlifts add 10 pounds each workout and perform the stated number of sets and reps. When the second set becomes challenging to complete, you have found your current limit weight. Use this weight for the given exercise until the end of week 8.

Other Exercises. For the other exercises, add 5 pounds each workout and perform the stated number of sets and reps. When the second set becomes challenging to complete, you have found your current limit weight. Use this weight for the given exercise until the end of week 8.

Examples. The following are examples of finding your limit weight for squat and barbell curls.

Squat Example For the previous 4 weeks you have been using 95 pounds for squats. This has felt hard, but not exceptionally challenging. You are currently working out 3 days a week, and will add 10 pounds to the squat each training day until you feel you've reached your limit weight. This will be a 30 pound addition per week, or up to a 120 pound addition by the end of week 8.

  • Week 5, Monday Workout - 105 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 5, Wednesday Workout - 115 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 5, Friday Workout - 125 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 6, Monday Workout - 135 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 6, Wednesday Workout - 145 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 6, Friday Workout - 155 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 7, Monday Workout - 165 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps

During week 7 you find that you are barely able to complete the second set of 12 reps. This means you have reached your limit weight for squats. Continue to use 165 pounds through the end of week 8.

Barbell Curl Example For the previous 4 weeks you have been using 45 pounds for barbell curls. This has felt hard, but not exceptionally challenging. You are currently working out 3 days a week, and will add 5 pounds to the squat each training day until you feel you've reached your limit weight. This will be a 15 pound addition per week, or up to a 60 pound addition by the end of week 8.

  • Week 5, Monday Workout - 50 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 5, Wednesday Workout - 55 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps
  • Week 5, Friday Workout - 60 pounds x 2 sets x 12 reps

After your third workout of week 5 you find that you are barely able to complete the second set of 12 reps. This means you have reached your limit weight for barbell curls. Continue to use 60 pounds through the end of week 8.

Workout Schedule, Weeks 5-8

  • Monday – Workout
  • Tuesday – Rest
  • Wednesday – Workout
  • Thursday – Rest
  • Friday – Workout
  • Saturday – Rest
  • Sunday – Rest

Exercise List, Weeks 5-8

Perform the follow exercises in the order listed. Dips and pull ups are 2 new additions. If you can't perform any dips or pullups, continue to use cable tricep extensions and lat pull downs. If you can only perform a few dips or pull ups, see the note below.

Weeks 5-8
Full Body
Exercise Sets Reps
Squat 2 12
Bench Press 2 12
Deadlift 2 12
Military Press 2 12
Barbell Row 2 12
Dips 2 12
Pull Ups 2 12
Barbell Curl 2 12
Seated Calf Raise 2 12
Sit Ups 2 12

Note on Dips and Pullups

If you are only able to do several dips and/or pullups, continue to use the exercise. Attempt to do as many as possible for both sets, limiting your max reps to 12 per set.

Notes on Weeks 5-8

At some point during these 4 weeks your workouts will start to feel very challenging. You will start to experience muscle soreness, and may not feel like working out. Continue to train, even if you are fatigue or sore. This is part of the conditioning process. Make sure you are eating plenty of food, drinking plenty of water and sleeping as much as possible. For more information on muscle building nutrition, please check out some of the sample eating plans on Muscle & Strength.

What's Next?

After week 8 do the following:

  1. Rest. Take a week completely off from training, rest and relax.
  2. Pick a Workout. Pick a new beginner workout from Muscle & Strength and make sure you understand how and when to add weight.

Related Workouts View all Beginner Workouts

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    Average: 4.1 (60 votes)
  • About The Author
    Steve is a powerlifter who has also spent 20 years training in bodybuilding. He is a national level competitor training for an all-time over 50 raw world record.
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Comments (267)

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Simone Espeleta
Posted Sat, 04/14/2012 - 20:32

im 23 years old, 167 cm, and 169 lbs.. I want to get rid of my belly fat and build some muscles.. Is this workout plan will be effective? Thanks.. :)

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Steve
Posted Sun, 04/15/2012 - 11:04

This is a solid choice for muscle building, but fat loss is all about diet. If you feel you have a few pounds to lose, setup a good meal plan while sticking to the progression scheme of this workout.

Here are some articles that can help with setting up a meal plan.

http://www.muscleandstrength.com/articles/your-go-to-guide-for-cutting-f...

https://www.muscleandstrength.com/articles/how-to-create-a-bodybuilding-...

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AJ
Posted Mon, 01/13/2014 - 18:52

Hey Steve,

I recently starting this workout routine and i realize that i lost 4 kgs in 5 days. i know the is something wrong. Probably my diet. I am a vegan and was wondering if you have any good tips for vegan diet?

Thanks.

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liang shi wee
Posted Sat, 09/22/2012 - 17:35

it will work.but start out with a light weight first.Than, slowly increase your weight if you feel that the weight that you use is light.

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David
Posted Wed, 04/18/2012 - 13:51

I have a question. I started out as a beginner, however have some pretty big friends who have been lifting for a long time and have helped me master bench, deadlift and squat technique. Thing is, after about 3 weeks of solidly learning all the techniques, I went into your Power Muscle Burn 4 days Split Steve, if this is a bad idea I do not know, I simply saw it was an "Intermediate" workout quite recently.
My gains have been good however, in about 4 weeks my squat is at 140kg (310lbs approx), bench is at about 60kg (130lbs approx) and deadlift is at 110kg (240lbs approx). Was it bad for me to be using the PMB workout? I am kind of worried that I may have lost out on the opportunity to make maybe bigger gains if I stuck to a beginner workout? I have been seeing visible changes though and my strength gains are improving really nicely. Have I made a mistake Steve or was it ok in this instance to rush(?) into things. Any reply would be greatly apprecaited.

Cheers.

P.S: I have also been going to the gym regularly, not missing any days as I am quite passionate about getting a nice physique. Been lifting for about 7-8 weeks now.

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Steve
Posted Wed, 04/18/2012 - 22:05

The PMB can certainly be ok for someone with decent form, and who is eating properly and focused on progression. The gains are going to be about the same in the long run. The real magic key to gains is going to be progression. If the PMB is working and you like it, stick with it.

Stay persistent, listen to your body and you'll do great.

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Saren
Posted Sat, 04/21/2012 - 07:27

Hi, I'm a beginner and I think this will be of great help to help me start working out. I have two questions though.

1. I'm 17 years old. Is it alright for me to start?
2. Should I workout if I'm cutting by running and not bulking?

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Steve
Posted Tue, 04/24/2012 - 11:15

Hi Saren,

1) Yes, this workout is a great place to start.
2) I do not recommend trying to lose fat at your age unless you are severely obese and are being guided by a family doctor.

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Justin
Posted Tue, 04/24/2012 - 00:21

I'm really skinny and I want to put some meat on my bones.. I was wondering what is the best workout for someone like me with fast results? Thanks!!

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Steve
Posted Tue, 04/24/2012 - 11:15

This is the perfect place to start.

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paul anderson
Posted Tue, 04/24/2012 - 06:55

what food should i eat and what protein should i be taking and what times??

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Steve
Posted Tue, 04/24/2012 - 11:16

Hi Paul,

Here is an article that can help get you started.

https://www.muscleandstrength.com/articles/how-to-create-a-bodybuilding-...

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Tim
Posted Thu, 04/26/2012 - 22:19

Hi Steve, I am just stating to work out. I am 49 yrs. old. I have a strength and muscle deficiency in my left arm and shoulder. Do you think i should work both right and left at the same time or should i gain some size and strength in the left first?

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Steve
Posted Fri, 04/27/2012 - 09:42

Hi Tim,

Without knowing much about the condition it's hard to say. In general I see little downside to focusing on both sides. This 8 week plan is designed to help you ease into lifting, so I recommend giving it a try for the entire body as see what happens. You can make adjustments from there.

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kev
Posted Fri, 04/27/2012 - 20:37

on the 8 week plan is there 3 workouts per week for weeks 5-8 or just 2 workouts?

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Steve
Posted Mon, 04/30/2012 - 12:28

3 per week, same as weeks 3 and 4.

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ray
Posted Sun, 04/29/2012 - 14:46

My gym does not have a machine for seated calf raise can I do a standing calf twist or just sit on a bench and put weight on my legs.

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Steve
Posted Mon, 04/30/2012 - 12:31

You can perform standing barbell or dumbbell calf raises.

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glyn thomas
Posted Mon, 04/30/2012 - 16:06

i am 62 yrs old been doing weights on and off for the last 40 yrs put a bit of muscle, I have been one of the lucky ones eat and drink and hardly notice, but now want to put more on and build legs up . I have always been fit running,swimming cycling etc. Fustrating not putting on muscle now. I have set of dumb bells now but its getting the right exercises having tried and read so much info confused where to go to now for results.

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/02/2012 - 10:04

Muscle building is primarily about persistence, progression of weight (challenging yourself), and using the best possible muscle building exercises. For legs, squats are excellent, as are exercises such as leg press, lunges, hack squats, etc. Learn good form, try to do a little more each week (weight or reps), and develop a good eating plan that can maximize your gym time.

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Brett
Posted Wed, 05/02/2012 - 05:20

Is there a substitute for deadlift?

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/02/2012 - 10:01

I do not recommend making changes to this workout unless an injury prevents you from performing a lift.

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Gary Sinclair
Posted Wed, 05/02/2012 - 07:45

Hi Steve

I am about to start this as off Friday i will let you know my progress

Gary

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/02/2012 - 10:01

Good luck.

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ginni cheema
Posted Thu, 05/03/2012 - 07:08

helllo steve !!!
i am free for 3 months and want good muscles please tell me is its ok to go for 3days a week or i can work for 5 days a week ???

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Steve
Posted Thu, 05/03/2012 - 09:34

Don't focus on adding training days right now. Focus on persistence and progression of weight using a proven workout.

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Tom
Posted Sun, 05/06/2012 - 14:56

Hey Steve, just one question, how long would you reccommend I wait inbetween each set? Thanks.

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 09:16

Probably about 60 seconds. When the weight starts to feel taxing, up to 90-120 seconds if needed.

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Mack
Posted Mon, 05/07/2012 - 13:34

Hi Steve

I am 22 years old, height 6 foot 3, weight 211. I need to lose 20 - 30 lbs, specially in belly area. I need your help.

currently i am burning 300 - 400 calories on cardio exercises and little more on muscle building exercise.

can you please advise me what to do in order to lose belly fat??

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 09:17
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andres
Posted Tue, 05/08/2012 - 19:30

im confused as to why there are 2 weeks 5-8, first it says exercise 3 days a week but after that says week 5-8 schedule only 2 days a week?

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 09:22

Fixed. It now reads 3x a week. My apologies.

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Amph
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 18:56

Hi Steve,
I have a couple of questions with regards to your 8 week novice quick start workout plan.

I started something very similar last year but dropped it because I was unable to go to gym for financial reasons.. will this mean I will still need to start the plan from the beginning ?

Also since I have been going to the gym for the last couple of weeks now I have started boxing training but the exercises that I'm currently doing are mainly cardio. If I were to follow the 8 week novice plan, will this affect my long term strategy in gaining strength and a well defined muscular physique? If so may you suggest a workout plan that can compliment my boxing training?

I would really like to get your advise on this.

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Steve
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 19:09

This would probably be a good program to use when easing back into things.

You can do cardio with this program. Just make sure you are eating enough to support muscle gains.

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Robert
Posted Wed, 05/09/2012 - 19:46

Hi Steve, I have trained a little bit before but still quite skinny. I'm around 5ft 6, and weighed about 63kg until I recently gave up smoking. I'm now around 70kg but see my ideal weight at around 76 or 77kg and would like to build muscle. I have bought mass gainer today and did my first workout. I have had a quick look at this plan and think it is the best option for me. What should I be eating and how often?

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Steve
Posted Tue, 05/15/2012 - 13:10

Hi Robert,

This article can help get you started. Let me know if you have any questions.

https://www.muscleandstrength.com/articles/how-to-create-a-bodybuilding-...

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Max
Posted Thu, 05/10/2012 - 11:12

Hi Steve, I've worked out on and off for a bit but I think I'll start here to make it regular. Conditioning has always been what stopped me. By light weight what do you mean, is there a % of 1RM? And when should weight be added to the lifts? Additionally I'm not a big fan of isolation exercises, do you think it's a bad idea to take out the tricep extension, barbell curl, calf raise, and sit up? I think I want to add a 4-move core routine in it's place.

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Steve
Posted Tue, 05/15/2012 - 13:13

No there is no percentage of one rep max. All the details of when to add weight are described in the article.

Do I think it's a bad idea to take out these lifts? Yes, for this program I do. It's designed to help prepare the body on multiple levels for more advanced workouts to come. I wouldn't change anything.

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PATRICK
Posted Tue, 05/15/2012 - 01:59

I started the novice workout today and found it was hard to finish, any suggestions

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Steve
Posted Tue, 05/15/2012 - 13:14

It shouldn't be too hard to finish as you are not starting with challenging weights. My only suggestion is to drop the weight, work on form, and see it through.

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Brian
Posted Tue, 05/15/2012 - 17:57

Ok...So I will be starting this workout tomorrow. I have been doing a few programs and trying to get back into lifting again so I have a fair idea of what to do. One question though is how long of a rest/break between sets/exercise should I be taking? 30 30, 45 seconds, or more into the the 1 or 2 minute range? i know for conditioning you want smaller time between sets and for strength you want longer rest. So what should we be looking at between week one, two, and three for a rest schedule during the workouts?

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Steve
Posted Thu, 05/24/2012 - 15:06

Rest a couple minutes between each sets. A little longer if need be for heavy, taxing sets.

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Jason
Posted Wed, 05/16/2012 - 17:38

I have a son that is 13 years old and has expressed interest in joining me in the weight room. I was looking for a basic starting place for him and this program seems to really lay out the basics in an easy to follow format, but I am concerned that he may be a bit too young to start weight training. What age would you recommend beginning weight training.

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Steve
Posted Thu, 05/24/2012 - 15:11

I would start him with bodyweight lifts, like pullups, pushups, etc., while also teaching him form on barbell and dumbbell lifts. Take it slow with little to no weight on the barbell and dumbbell lifts. After he feels comfortable with the lifts you could start a very mild form of progression.

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carlos
Posted Mon, 05/21/2012 - 09:29

Wassup Steve,

Ive been doing your workout for 4wks now...and I'm starting to see result, throughout the workout I've skipped the Deadlife and the Barbell Row because I am affraid of injury to my Back...my question to you is By me leaving those 2 workouts out of the workout plan does that Hurt me in any kind of way??...

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Steve
Posted Thu, 05/24/2012 - 15:13

It's not wise to ignore back training. This will lead to muscular imbalances, which can then lead to injury.

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Diva
Posted Tue, 05/29/2012 - 03:44

Hey Steve, I'm an older lady looking to rebuild fitness after a few years off. I was a competitive cyclist, and just loved lifting weights, much to my coaches dismay. Since I am older and wanting to keep as much muscle as possible (or build even), but haven't lifted in over 4 years, is this a good place to start? I do intend to keep riding, but again, have to rebuild my fitness there, too. Thanks.

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Steve
Posted Fri, 06/01/2012 - 10:04

hi Diva,

Yes this is a good place to start. Good luck!

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Brad
Posted Tue, 05/29/2012 - 21:39

Steve I am overweight and unable to do any pullups or dips. What is a possibly substitution for those until I can get stronger and/or lose some weight?

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Steve
Posted Fri, 06/01/2012 - 10:05

Hi Brad,

If you can't perform any dips or pullups, continue to use cable tricep extensions and lat pull downs.

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