You are here

Superhuman Strength: A 2 Stage Plan To Get Strong Fast

Average: 4.4 (20 votes)
4.4 5 20
Feeling weak? Feel weak no longer! Muscle & Strength has put together the ultimate plan to get you strong as quickly as possible.

Muscle & Strength Presents: Superhuman Strength

Right now you feel hopeless. You feel weak and pathetic. You've tried and tried and tried, but you can't seem to get any stronger. Well don't give up quite yet, because I have a plan just for you. This plan involves 2 stages:

Before we get started you have to understand a few things. Strength training isn't for the weak. Sure, you might be physically weak right now, but that's now what I'm talking about. To make great strength gains you have to be mentally tough. It was my goal to make this program as easy as possible, while still being explosively effective. Easy is a relative term.

During the 2 stages of this plan, you will not be beaten down with volume training, or forced to do anything ridiculous like squatting on a bosu ball. This is not a gimmicky strength building approach. This approach focuses on basic, core, tried and true strength building lifts and practices. But despite the relative simplicity of the Superhuman Strength Plan, it will be mentally challenging.

You may want to quit. You may want to skip workouts. You way want to give less than 100% on some sets. You may want to ignore the diet advice. You may want to insert in some of your favorite lifts. You may want to insert in complicated strength building principles and advice from another trainer. My advice - don't. Simply don't.

Don't quit. Don't skip workouts. Don't skip meals. Don't give anything less than 110% on every set. Don't change the program. And last but not least, don't lie to yourself and pretend that you are following the program as designed if you are not. I want you to get strong. Physical strength does not stand along - it walks side by side with mental toughness.

"It is not the critic who counts: not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming, but who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, who spends himself for a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows, in the end, the triumph of high achievement, and who, at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who knew neither victory nor defeat." - Theodore Roosevelt

Don't give anything less than 110% on every set.

Foundations Of The Superhuman Strength Plan

There is nothing new under the sun. I did not invent the tools and principles used in this plan, I merely pieced them together in my own way. I recommend that you broaden your horizons and read everything you can from John Christy, Mark Rippetoe and Doug Hepburn. Each of these men shaped my love for the iron immensely, and they will impact you as well.

The foundations of this plan are as follows:

  • Simplicity. Strength training is about getting stronger in an efficient manner. This means that in many ways, you will not be training like a bodybuilder. Resist the urge to bodybuildify strength training. If you eat correctly, you will gain muscle as well as strength - and you will not need 7 exercises for every small body part to do so.
  • 4 Primary Lifts. You will be training 4 times per week, focusing on one of the following lifts each day: squat, deadlift, bench press and overhead press (military press or seated BTN press). Other important lifts include barbell rows, pullups, Romanian deadlifts, good mornings, front squats, barbell curls and the close grip bench press.
  • Rest. Rest 2 to 5 minutes between heavy, taxing sets. There is no need to jump from set to set. Regain your composure before lifting again. For supplementary exercises that are performed in bodybuilding-style ranges of 6 to 10 reps, rest 90 to 120 seconds between sets.
  • Diet. To maximize strength gains you need to eat properly. I have provided 2 diet options - A GOMAD option (gallon of milk a day), and a non-GOMAD option for those of you that dislike drinking milk. Keep in mind that I am neither trying to keep you lean nor make you immensely overweight. You will gain some bodyfat on this plan, as well as plenty of muscle. If you want to know how to get strong while keeping your 6-pack - well, let's just say it's hard enough for the average Joe to get a six pack. If staying lean is a primary goal, I suggest sticking with more of a bodybuilding style training and diet approach.
  • Form. Good form is essential when focusing on strength. Never stop learning! It is beyond the scope of this article to delve into proper exercise form. Suffice it to say that if you do now know what good exercise form is for the major lifts, you should spend several weeks learning that exercise before starting this program. No lifter ever masters form. As the weight gets heavier and heavier, new form challenges arise. I will say it again - never stop working on your form.

One last note before we begin. I am sorry to say that this is not a program that can easily be performed at home, unless you have a nice home gym setup and a squat rack. Therefore, unless you can perform all of the listed exercises in the program, I wouldn't recommend trying this program. Once you start swapping out exercises, you lose the heart and soul of this program. Simply stated, if you change the program, I can't guarantee it's effectiveness.

Stage 1: Fast Start - Linear Progression

Squat for overall strength.Linear progression is a straight forward means of adding weight to lifts. Each week you will add a specified amount of weight for each exercise performed. During Stage 1 you will be performing 3 sets of 8 reps on all 4 major lifts (squat, deadlift, overhead press and bench press).

At some point during this progression, you will be unable to complete 8 reps for all 3 sets. At this time you will continue to use the same linear progressional scheme, but will switch to 3 sets of 5 reps. Continue to progress in weight, and when you can no longer complete 3 sets of 5 reps, switch to 4 sets of 3 reps. Continue to use linear progression.

Once you are unable to perform 4 sets of 3 reps, you are at the end of Stage 1 for that particular lift. At this time, you will begin to use the Stage 2 progression approach for that lift, and that lift only. Here is a summary of the 8/5/3 method:

  • 3 sets of 8 reps. Continue using linear progression until you can no longer perform 3 sets of 8 reps. Do NOT perform more than 8 reps on any set. When you can no longer complete 3 sets of 8 reps, move to 3 sets of 5 reps.
  • 3 sets of 5 reps. Continue using linear progression until you can no longer perform 3 sets of 5 reps. Do NOT perform more than 5 reps on any set. When you can no longer complete 3 sets of 5 reps, move to 4 sets of 3 reps.
  • 4 sets of 3 reps. Continue using linear progression until you can no longer perform 4 sets of 3 reps. Do NOT perform more than 3 reps on any set. When you can no longer complete 4 sets of 3 reps for a lift, begin Stage 2 for that lift.

Linear Progression Scheme

Lifts are placed into 3 categories: major lifts, accessory lifts and minor lifts. Each of these categories follows a seperate progressional scheme, with the primary - and most important - focus of this stage being major lifts. Adhere to the following linear progression approaches during Stage 1:

  • Major Lift - Squats and Deadlift. Add 10 pounds per week.
  • Major Lift - Bench Press and Overhead Press. Add 5 pounds per week.
  • Accessory Lift - Rep ranges are 6 to 10. When you can perform 10 reps for ALL 3 sets, add 5 pounds to the lift.
  • Minor Lift - Minor lifts are performed in the 10 to 15 rep range. When you can perform 15 reps for ALL 3 sets, add 5 pounds to the lift.

What weight do I start with?

For the major lifts, start with a weight that allows you to perform one set of approximately 15 reps. This might seem like a "low" level to start at, but for beginners it will work just fine. Remember that you will be aggressively adding weight week by week, so if the first several weeks seem too light, consider it a break in period.

For accessory lifts, chose a weight that allows you to perform approximately 10 reps. Because accessory lifts focus on performance based progression, there is no reason to start lighter than this.

For minor lifts, begin with a weight that allows you to perform approximately 15 reps. Minor lifts are also performance based, so don't try to start too heavy or light.

How long will I stay on Stage 1?

In general, Stage 1 will last no longer than 4-5 months per lift, unless you are a beast and/or a genetically gifted athlete. If you start with a 135 pound squat and stall at 275 x 4 sets x 3 reps, you will have been on the program for about 4 months. Many of you will stall sooner than this.

Do not be concerned with the length of time you are on Stage 1. The goal isn't to remain on it as long as possible. The goal is to get as strong as possible. Work as hard as you can, and let the chips fall where they may. Stage 1 is merely a primer to get your strength up to speed as fast as possible. Stage 2 is where the real work begins - beginners gains are gone, and it will be time to get to work!

Do not be concerned with the length of time you are on Stage 1.

The Stage 1 Workout

I can't stress this enough...do not change or tweak this workout. It works if you work it. There will be plenty of time to add in your favorite lifts at a later date. You do NOT need to add in 9 sets for biceps twice a week. Use this program, eat correctly, and trust in the process.

Monday
Deadlift Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Deadlift (Major) 3 8
Barbell Rows (Accessory) 3 6-10
Pull Ups or Lat Pull Down (Accessory) 3 6-10
Barbell Curls (Accessory) 3 6-10
Tuesday
Bench Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Bench Press (Major) 3 8
Close Grip Bench Press (Accessory) 3 6-10
Dips or Dumbbell Bench Press (Accessory) 3 6-10
Dumbbell Side Bends (Minor) 3 6-10
Thursday
Squat Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Squat (Major) 3 8
Romanian Deadlift (Accessory) 3 6-10
Standing Barbell Calf Raise (Minor) 3 10-15
Weighted Sit Up (Minor) 3 10-15
Friday
Overhead Press Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Military Press (Major) 3 8
Upright Row (Accessory) 3 6-10
Bent Over Reverse Fly (Minor) 3 10-15
Hanging Leg Raise (Minor) 3 10-15

Notes:

Overhead Press - You may any popular variations of the overhead press: military press, seated military press, or seated behind the neck press.

Dips - Perform dips if possible. If you can't perform dips, use dumbbell bench presses instead.

Pull Ups - Perform pull ups if possible. If you can't perform pull ups, use lat pull downs instead.

Stage 2: Consistent Progress - Single Rep Progression

Never waste a set.During Stage 2 you will following a simple progressional pattern for each of the major 4 lifts. This approach will allow you to add over 80 pounds to your squat and deadlift each year, and at least 40 pounds to your bench press and overhead press each year.

Stage 2 Starting Weight

To determine the weight to start at for Stage 2 Major Lifts, take the weight you ended Stage 1 with, and subtract 20 pounds. You will be starting slightly lighter but performing more sets.

By the time you have completed Stage 1, you should have very respectable lift totals. Even if your totals are no where near where you had hoped them to be, don't worry. You have put in the time and effort, and are now ready to move from intermediate to advanced lifter.

Stage 2 can be run as long as you'd like, and as long as it's working. During Stage 2 you will learn much about your body, and over time you will be able to make workout tweaks and changes that are needed. I do not advocate rushing out to make changes when they are not yet needed or required. Once again, adding in too much bicep work before you can squat 350 and bench 250 isn't the wisest of moves.

Stage 2 Single Rep Progression

During Stage 2, each major lift will follow a 6 week cycle. This cycle is detailed below. Rest 2 to 3 minutes between sets for major lifts. After you finish a 6 week cycle for squat or deadlift, add 10 pounds to the bar and begin the cycle again. After you complete a 6 week cycle for bench press or overhead press, add at least 5 pounds to the bar and begin the cycle again.

  • Week 1 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,2,2,2,2,2
  • Week 2 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,3,2,2,2,2
  • Week 3 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,3,3,2,2,2
  • Week 4 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,3,3,3,2,2
  • Week 5 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,3,3,3,3,2
  • Week 6 Major Lift Rep Scheme - 3,3,3,3,3,3

Continue using this progressional scheme until you fail on a rep. At that time you may need to explore micro-loading, or a more advanced strength training workout. With that said, it may be several years before you reach failure using this system of progression. Do NOT quite immediately upon failing on a single set. Make several more attempts on subsequent workouts to continue this program.

For minor and accessory lifts, continue to use the same progression strategy used in Stage 1. If stalls occur, don't be concerned. Keep pushing, but don't give up on an exercise.

Strains and Pains

This can be a very intense style of training. It is OK to take a few days off from training here or there is your body is feeling beat up. If you feel like you need a lighter week, I recommend dropping the weight by 30% and simply taking a deload week using the same rep schemes.

Good Mornings

During Stage 2 the good morning is introduced. Good mornings are an amazing strength building exercise that assist both the squat and deadlift. Understand that powerlifting/strength style good mornings are not the same as bodybuilding-style good mornings. Begin with a stance slightly wider than your squat stance. With a tight back, move your hips slowly backwards while lowering the barbell forward and down. Make sure your knees are slightly bent at the beginning of this movement. It is OK to sink your hips a bit while lowering the weight. Don't try to bring your body parallel to the ground. It's better to lower the weight to approximately 45 degrees.

I strongly advice doing some research on powerlifting style good mornings during Stage 1 training. It's also a good idea to practice this exercise with a very light weight during Stage 1. If you are uncomfortable with good mornings, don't rush to add weight. Practice your form until you feel comfortable with the movement and then start pushing yourself.

The Stage 2 Workout

As mentioned previously, when you come to the end of Stage 1, you will simply swap in the Stage 2 workout for that lift. You do NOT move all 4 lifts to Stage 2.

Monday
Deadlift Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Deadlift (Major) 6 *2-3*
Front Squat (Accessory) 3 6-10
Barbell Rows (Accessory) 3 6-10
Pull Ups or Lat Pull Down (Accessory) 3 6-10
Barbell Curls (Accessory) 3 6-10
Tuesday
Bench Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Bench Press (Major) 6 *2-3*
Close Grip Bench Press (Accessory) 3 6-10
Dips or Dumbbell Bench Press (Accessory) 3 6-10
Skullcrushers (Accessory) 3 6-10
Dumbbell Side Bends (Minor) 3 6-10
Thursday
Squat Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Squat (Major) 6 *2-3*
Good Mornings (Accessory) 3 6-10
Romanian Deadlift (Accessory) 3 6-10
Standing Barbell Calf Raise (Minor) 3 10-15
Weighted Sit Up (Minor) 3 10-15
Friday
Overhead Press Day
Exercise Sets Reps
Military Press (Major) 6 *2-3*
Seated Dumbbell Press (Accessory) 3 6-10
Barbell Shrugs (Accessory) 3 6-10
Bent Over Reverse Fly (Minor) 3 10-15
Hanging Leg Raise (Minor) 3 10-15

Strength Building Diet

There are many ways to approach healthy eating. It is not my intention to turn this section into an in-depth analysis of popular diet plans. Suffice it to say that if you don't eat enough, you make it harder to gain strength. I strongly urge you to try to GOMAD approach, at least during Stage 1. GOMAD stands for "gallon of milk a day." Stated better, it means you drink one gallon of whole milk per day. Not skim milk or 2%. WHOLE milk.

GOMAD Diet

The GOMAD diet plan is simple. You eat three square meals per day, and one gallon of whole milk. One gallon is 16 cups. So if you are thinking in terms of a bodybuilding style diet, this is about 2-3 cups every 2.5 to 3 hours.

Your whole food meals should be nutritious and healthy. A sample breakfast could be oatmeal, some fruit and a big cheese omelet. Make sure that your largest whole foods meal is the meal that follows training. I also highly suggest that you try to make every meal a balanced meal, and eat some form of healthy carbs and protein. And don't forget your fruits and veggies. Finally, don't avoid beef. Beef is the king of protein foods. There is no need to live on chicken breasts and broccoli.

What if you feel hungry? Snack! Munch on some almonds or dark chocolate. Have a sandwich made with natural peanut butter. Or if you have a real hard time gaining weight, eat some ice cream before bed. I would also tell hardgainers that they should not shy away from buffets. Eat, eat and eat.

if you undereat, you will make is very difficult to gain strength.

Not-GOMAD Diet

For those of you that can't - or won't - drink a gallon of milk per day, you need to do your homework. By this I mean you must watch the scale, and make sure you are eating enough to gain weight. I strongly recommend eating 500 calories above maintenance levels (or more). If you have no clue what daily calorie level allows you to maintain your current weight, here is my suggestion:

  • Required Daily Calories - Eat 3500 calories per day for 2 weeks. If you don't gain any weight, add 500 more to this total for the next 2 weeks. In a perfect world you would like to gain at least a pound or two per month.

As I have stated previously, I'm not trying to make you overweight. But if you undereat, you will make is very difficult to gain strength or muscle. Our goal is to eat enough so you make great strength gains. If you are gaining weight too rapidly, make dietary adjustments. If you are eating mostly healthy, it will be hard to gain too much fat unless you have an incredibly slow metabolism.

Non-GOMADians may also want to consider the option of drinking only a half gallon of whole milk per day.

Related Articles View all Workout Articles

  • Share This Article
  • Rate & Share
    Average: 4.4 (20 votes)
  • About The Author
    Steve is a powerlifter who has also spent 20 years training in bodybuilding. He is a national level competitor training for an all-time over 50 raw world record.
Related Supplements View all Top Supplements
Amino1

The Ultimate Hydration & Recover System with "Nature's IV Fluid!"*

4.6
Average: 4.6 (10 votes)
Quest Bar

High Protein, Low In Non-Fiber Carbs & No Sugar Alcohols!

4.8
Average: 4.8 (10 votes)

Comments (54)

Add a comment

No Profile Pic
joe
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 00:28

would it be ok to run the second stage for 4 weeks instead of 6? maybe by using only 4 sets? or by starting with 3,3,3,2,2,2?

  • 15
  • 21
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 09:13

Hi Joe,

You could definitely give it a try. There would be no harm in experimenting.

  • 19
  • 19
No Profile Pic
joe
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 10:49

which approach would you use? having only 4 sets would be cutting yourself short on some volume. and going from a failed 4x3 to 3,3,3,2,2,2 may not be a great transition

  • 14
  • 22
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 12:15

I would use the 4 week cycle.

You could certainly use only 4 sets. 8 heavy reps per week is still a relatively high intensity approach.

  • 10
  • 19
No Profile Pic
Lucas
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 14:33

Did I just miss this, but, where or at what % do you start Stage 2 at for your major lifts. Like in stage 1 you said use a weight you can do 15 times. What is the weight in stage 2 that you start at for your sets of 3,2,2,2,2,2. I get adding the 10 pounds just need to know where to start.

  • 20
  • 15
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Wed, 08/04/2010 - 15:31

Hi Lucas,

Thanks for pointing that out. I have corrected this in the article to read:

"To determine the weight to start at for Stage 2 Major Lifts, take the weight you ended Stage 1 with, and subtract 20 pounds. You will be starting slightly lighter but performing more sets."

  • 21
  • 18
No Profile Pic
mike
Posted Mon, 08/09/2010 - 07:24

ok i was wondering if we should change the accesory and minor lifts after like a month or so?

  • 12
  • 13
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Tue, 08/10/2010 - 12:24

Hi Mike,

As long as they are comparable lifts. Most of the accessory lifts, like barbell rows and front squats, shouldn't be changed. Were you looking at certain exercises?

  • 14
  • 15
No Profile Pic
Knoah
Posted Fri, 08/13/2010 - 22:36

I was wondering of how flexible the workout days are? For example, moving Friday’s workout to Saturday.

Also for starting weight for Stage 1, for the 15 reps, would that be of my max? for example my bench is 270 i woulkd start at like 170ish.

  • 11
  • 20
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Sat, 08/14/2010 - 10:32

Hi Knoah,

You can move the days around as long as the pattern of rest in between workouts is kept.

For stage one, the 15 reps would be approximately your 15 rep max. 170 sounds about right.

  • 18
  • 11
No Profile Pic
Erick
Posted Mon, 08/16/2010 - 21:13

steve im looking for the biggest, baddest, hardcore, POWERLIFTING routine out there, can you hook me up?

  • 16
  • 18
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Tue, 08/17/2010 - 11:50

Hi Erick,

That's why I designed this program....to get you strong as fast as possible.

  • 15
  • 22
No Profile Pic
james
Posted Tue, 08/31/2010 - 14:49

steve,

I had to drop my bench press weight down 2olbs this week. I could only get one rep out when i added the 5 lbs this week.

  • 12
  • 15
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Thu, 09/02/2010 - 13:58

Hi James,

How many reps did you do the previous week with the lighter weight?

  • 12
  • 18
No Profile Pic
james
Posted Sat, 09/04/2010 - 18:13

I did 3 sets of 8 reps barbell bench press the previous week.

  • 17
  • 11
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Tue, 09/07/2010 - 12:36

Hi James,

Just so I'm understanding you correctly, you performed 3 sets of 8 reps with a weight, added 5 pounds, and could only perform one rep the next week?

  • 19
  • 14
No Profile Pic
james
Posted Fri, 09/10/2010 - 14:32

Yes,I performed 3 sets of 8 reps with 160 pounds and the next week I increased the weight by five pounds and I could only perform one rep. I had to drop 20 pounds to perform 5 reps.

  • 19
  • 11
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Tue, 09/14/2010 - 09:03

Hi James,

I apologize. I am simply having a hard time following this. You were able to perform 3 sets x 8 reps with 160. Then the next week you could only do 165 x 1 rep, and 140 x 5 reps?

It sounds like a very off week. Being able to perform 3 sets x 8 reps with 160 would generally indicate to me that your one rep max is close to 210-215-220. I'm not sure what happened the next week, but it is highly unusual. I've never seen that before.

I would drop to 125-135 pounds and start to work your way back up.

  • 13
  • 12
No Profile Pic
trev
Posted Mon, 08/11/2014 - 22:05

I've seen that before Steve...it seems someone started their routine at too high of a weight and hit the wall extremely early. I had a friend who wanted to hit the gym with me when I was starting my cycle over....I started my deadlift way below my max at 225 for 3 sets of 6 and he insisted that he is able to do it when I advised against it because he never deadlifted before....long story short, the following week he was unable to keep up and perform as well as he did on the first week ..eventually he stopped going....I guess starting real light seem unattractive to him.....I like the program....seems light on the volume but I'm pressed for time due to busy schedule....thanks for sharing

  • 2
  • 2
No Profile Pic
Ayman
Posted Sat, 10/09/2010 - 11:21

Hello Steve..
I need an advice, for the Bench Press, Overhead Press, and Barbell Curls exercises, I have to add 5 pounds per week, that means 2.5 pounds in each side of the barbell, the problem is at the gym I train in the lightest weight is 5 pounds, there is no 2.5 pounds weight. in this case what shall I do?
I started stage 1 already but I noticed there are no exercises for the triceps, it is a secondary muscle in 2 exercises but there is no exercise in the schedule for the tri, just wondering for the reason.
you also said that I should not tweak the program in any way, just wanted to ask if it is ok to do one or two more abs exercises weekly.

  • 15
  • 17
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Mon, 10/11/2010 - 13:03

Hi Ayman,

I would add 10 pounds every 2 weeks for bench and overhead press, and maybe 10 pounds per month for bicep curls.

Stage one has plenty of tricep work...bench press, close grip bench press, dips and military press. These exercises will pack on muscle and strength, and build beefy triceps.

You could add some ab work.

  • 19
  • 12
No Profile Pic
Tyler
Posted Tue, 11/30/2010 - 22:28

Hey Steve,

Im a little confused. My guess for the workout Ill start at X weight for 3x8. Ill continue each week adding weight until at X weight i can no longer do 3x8. Then i drop to 3x5. Continue with that until i can not complete and then do 4x3? Is that correct?

After i can no longer do X weight at 4x3 then Im ready for stage 2?

Please let me know if i have it right. Ive re-read it a few times and cant seem to put it together.

Thanks.

  • 15
  • 16
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Thu, 12/02/2010 - 13:52

Hi Tyler,

Yes, you are correct. Keep adding small weight increases each workout until you can't hit the recommended number of reps.

  • 13
  • 18
No Profile Pic
Tyler
Posted Thu, 12/02/2010 - 16:12

Thanks Steve.
Also if we are doing the GOMAD diet, do we really no longer need to add a protein shake into the mix?

  • 17
  • 17
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Tue, 12/07/2010 - 10:34

Hi Tyler,

Probably not. If you are having a hard time gaining weight you might want to add extra protein or a weight gainer, but GOMAD will give you plenty of daily protein, in addition to your regular 3 square meals.

  • 18
  • 16
No Profile Pic
Mike
Posted Sun, 12/12/2010 - 19:52

Can we continue to use this regimen as part of a cut phase?

  • 8
  • 19
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Sun, 12/19/2010 - 16:31

Absolutely.

  • 10
  • 15
No Profile Pic
Mike
Posted Sat, 12/18/2010 - 08:21

Are we supposed to use the same weight for all the reps performed? So when we do 3 sets of 8 reps, all 3 of those sets are performed at the same weight.

  • 13
  • 22
Steve's picture
Steve
Posted Sun, 12/19/2010 - 16:33

Hi Mike,

Yes. On Stage 1 you use the same weight for all sets, and add weight each week.

  • 18
  • 13
No Profile Pic
adan
Posted Fri, 03/04/2011 - 16:24

Hi Steve,

I am just hesitating about what to do, about four months ago, I started one of your program: The Power Muscle Burn 5 Day Power-building Split. I have been quite satisfied but now I feel curious about this superhuman strength program.

Do you think I already have a good foundation to go for the superhuman strength program? is it harder or more difficult than the the first one? or can I do one week this program and another week the power muscle?

I am also wondering if I could add some clean and jerks plus other explosive workouts I know by myself and also if I can do my run plus swimming on top of that?

Will this program give me some more mass and strength than the power muscle burn 5 day power-building? Do you also think that this program could fit well for some combats I do like: Brazilian jujitsu, wrestling as well as boxing?

I will appreciate your response and thanks a lot in advance for sharing those great workouts!

Adan

  • 11
  • 22
No Profile Pic
adan
Posted Sat, 03/05/2011 - 06:20

Hi Steve,

I am just hesitating about what to do, about four months ago, I started one of your program: The Power Muscle Burn 5 Day Power-building Split. I have been quite satisfied but now I feel curious about this superhuman strength program.

Do you think I already have a good foundation to go for the superhuman strength program? is it harder or more difficult than the the first one? or can I do one week this program and another week the power muscle?

I am also wondering if I could add some clean and jerks plus other explosive workouts I know by myself and also if I can do my run plus swimming on top of that?

Will this program give me some more mass and strength than the power muscle burn 5 day power-building? Do you also think that this program could fit well for some combats I do like: Brazilian jujitsu, wrestling as well as boxing?

I will appreciate your response and thanks a lot in advance for sharing those great workouts!

Adan

  • 20
  • 10
No Profile Pic
adam
Posted Tue, 03/08/2011 - 04:55

Hi Steve,

I am just hesitating about what to do, about four months ago, I started one of your program: The Power Muscle Burn 5 Day Power-building Split. I have been quite satisfied but now I feel curious about this superhuman strength program.

Do you think I already have a good foundation to go for the superhuman strength program? is it harder or more difficult than the the first one? or can I do one week this program and another week the power muscle?

I am also wondering if I could add some clean and jerks plus other explosive workouts I know and also if I can do my run plus swimming on top of that?

Will this program give me some more mass and strength than the power muscle burn 5 day power-building? Do you also think that this program could fit well for some combats I do like: Brazilian jujitsu, wrestling as well as boxing?

I will appreciate your response and thanks a lot in advance for sharing those great workouts!

Adan

  • 10
  • 23
No Profile Pic
Adam
Posted Tue, 03/15/2011 - 16:25

Hi Steve,

I am wondering if this program will be more effective in terms of muscle mass and strength in comparison to the Power Muscle Burn 5 Day Power building Split?

Thanks a lot for those workouts you provide Steve. I'll also appreciate your response to my question.

Best!

Adan

  • 12
  • 15
No Profile Pic
Mike
Posted Sat, 03/19/2011 - 21:40

If I wanted to combine this with the 4 week bulk/cut, should I use a heavier weight set during the bulk, and a lighter one during the cut, or should I use the same weight set throughout the duration?

  • 17
  • 21
No Profile Pic
Rob J
Posted Tue, 05/10/2011 - 13:24

Hey Steve,
I'm into my fifth week of stage one of this workout, barbel curls are giving me a lot of problems with pain along the forearms now the weight is higher. Can i swap this excercise out and use dumbells instead without too much difference, or should i stick with the bar at lower weight until i get a little stronger?
Let me know if u can,
regards,
Rob

  • 19
  • 11
No Profile Pic
Justin
Posted Fri, 08/03/2012 - 23:46

Hi Steve,

I just want to confirm my understanding. Correct me at any point if I'm wrong.

3 sets of 8, when I fail to complete all of the sets, 3 sets of 5, and when I fail to complete all of the sets, 4 sets of 3. Start stage 2 for that lift when failing to complete all of the sets. At this point I use single rep progression for major lift whiles maintaining linear progression for the remainder of the exercises as well as adding a new exercise to the mix. I think I got it. Great article, and I will be embarking this journey to strength using the GOMAD diet. Thank you for the great work.

  • 13
  • 17
No Profile Pic
Ben
Posted Wed, 11/28/2012 - 15:59

Is this workout good for 17 year old i want my bech to go from 115 to 185

  • 14
  • 20
No Profile Pic
Moises
Posted Wed, 03/20/2013 - 12:28

if we can do more pull ups on every set than required, do we do weighted pull ups or a different exercise??

  • 5
  • 34
No Profile Pic
JOHN
Posted Sat, 05/25/2013 - 05:08

NEW TO WORKING OUT IN A GYM AT LEAST. I AM CURRENTLY IN AFGHANISTAN AND TRYING TO BUILD MUSCLE AND GET STRONGER. WHAT WOULD BE THE BEST WAY TO DO ALL THIS? ESPECIALLY BEING SO NEW TO THE LIFTING WORLD. THANKS SO MUCH. SEMPER FI

~JOHN

  • 25
  • 30
No Profile Pic
Chris
Posted Mon, 06/03/2013 - 13:42

Hi there I am a Gaelic Footballer and stumbled upon this program. I have been lifting weights for a good while, whilst I'm not a novice I'm certainly no expert. I am 5'8" and 67KG. After nearly 2 months out with cracked ribs my current lifts are: Squat 110kg 4 x 3, deadlift 150kg 3x5, bench 78.5kg 3 x 5 and Over head press 50kg 3x5. I am currently in the league season and have lost some strength due to the injury and probably also the demands of team training and matches. My main cup competition starts in August. I want to try to get as strong as possible in the build up for this (as well as keep up my conditioning and matches). Would it be suitable yet to jump to your stage two plan or should I continue to ride out the linear progression? Advice most welcome, thanks.

  • 11
  • 17
No Profile Pic
shauny horny
Posted Wed, 06/05/2013 - 02:11

hi hey how.
Ah QQ: (if anyone could answer) Do you think it is sweet to throw lunges in. So it would be Squat, Romanians, Walky Lunges. then the DB chicken wing raises....

Thanks: Shaun

  • 27
  • 8
No Profile Pic
Corbin
Posted Sun, 06/09/2013 - 13:31

Thank you for sharing your expertise with this workout. I've been shopping around for a good program, and it has come down to your Superhuman Strength workout versus Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. Can you (or anyone who has done your program) tell me what benefits your program has over Starting Strength? I'm 6'4" and tried P90X twice but it just kept making me skinny with no mass. I've got a medium frame with long arms, long legs, medium-long torso, good hip width, and broad shoulders. I just want to get strong as fast as possible. Thanks! Corbin

  • 9
  • 21
No Profile Pic
Tommy Richardson
Posted Thu, 06/20/2013 - 18:42

I am 76 - Competed in 100% raw natural powerlifting competition in Los Vegas last Oct..Want to increase my strength for this years competition in Bench and Curl.I weigh 220 pounds. Do I need to make any changes to your program due to my age ? Also any suggestions for training progress for strict curl ? Enjoyed your information and look forward to your help. .

  • 16
  • 14
No Profile Pic
Warren
Posted Sun, 07/28/2013 - 08:03

Hi Steve, when using this program do the exercises have to be done in that exact order ? ie could I do the pullups before the bent over rows as there is no way I would have enough strength left in the tank for pull ups after dead lifts and bent over rows.
Like wise could I do dips before close grip benching as once again I wouldn't have enough strength left after bench press and close grip benches to do dips.

  • 18
  • 14
No Profile Pic
Hilal
Posted Fri, 08/30/2013 - 08:00

hi Steve,
is this better than the madcow intermediate programs??

  • 12
  • 11
No Profile Pic
i dont know
Posted Thu, 12/05/2013 - 09:03

Hi, I've got a question!
How long should I rest between exercises?

  • 17
  • 24
No Profile Pic
John Boy
Posted Sun, 01/05/2014 - 06:19

I'm sorry, but I've read stage 2 a few times and am still confused. So say you take Squat and Deadlift for the 6x(2-3 reps) what rep scheme would you be doing on the Bench/Military Press days? Would you just restart 3x8 and then swap after the 6 weeks of heavy Squatting/DLs are up?

Just began stage 1, I'm liking it! Can't wait to see what the following weeks will bring.

  • 14
  • 13
No Profile Pic
Anon
Posted Thu, 01/23/2014 - 14:59

I have been on starting strength for 2 months now. I have been making great gains and haven't stalled yet. I don't like squatting every day though and I like your linear progression better (variable reps). I'm squatting 230lbs, deadlifting 275lbs, benching 160lbs, and overhead pressing 100lbs.

Instead of starting with a weight that allows me to do one set of 15, could I just take off some weight, say 50lbs, from each lift and start 3x8 from there? Am I strong enough to do the 3x8 at those weights
(say 170/215/110/65) or would you suggest starting my progress over from a very light weight (45/95)?

  • 7
  • 14
No Profile Pic
hilal
Posted Sun, 02/09/2014 - 14:51

Hi steve ,
U r defntly a great mentor.i've cmpleted the 12th week of
madcow 5x5.can i start doing the stage2 already?

  • 14
  • 18
No Profile Pic
Dman
Posted Sun, 03/16/2014 - 04:06

Is it ok to do cardio as well? ... like 20-40 mins of hard running with sprints for 4-5 x's/week. I want to grow my cardiovascular system's blood vessels with the sprints, the sprints keep testo up too, the regular running will trim some of the fat too. Will it be too much of a sacrifice?

Thanks

  • 4
  • 4

Pages

Add new comment