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  1. #1
    M&S Senior Member Skippysje's Avatar
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    Default Increase Deadlift intensity with limited weight.

    I have limited weights to use for deadlifts (70kg) and would like to know if anyone has any experience with increasing deadlift intensity with limited weight?
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  2. #2
    Frequent Poster whatzhiznutz's Avatar
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    Default

    Don't know if it will increase intensity, but Romainian (stiff leg) Deads always feel more intense to me with lighter weights. Maybe switch to lifting that way?

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    Seasoned M&S Veteran iRoCx45s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatzhiznutz View Post
    Don't know if it will increase intensity, but Romainian (stiff leg) Deads always feel more intense to me with lighter weights. Maybe switch to lifting that way?
    Two completely different exercises. Stiff leg's primary muscle is the hams while the DL's primaries are back, glutes and hams.
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  4. #4
    Regular Poster Davebrah's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Skippysje View Post
    I have limited weights to use for deadlifts (70kg) and would like to know if anyone has any experience with increasing deadlift intensity with limited weight?
    If you would like to increase your deadflift intensity with limited weight, what you could do is take shorter breaks 30 seconds to 1 minute. Also you can implement rest pause, do as many reps as you can, wait 10 seconds then start again. These will increase hypertrophy. Also dropsetting would work nicely.

  5. #5
    M&S Senior Member OneGun's Avatar
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    Default

    Unfortunately, with not being able to add any weight to the bar, you're not going to really be able to make any long term progress (sorry to be a Buzz Killington). Doing higher reps will make the sets feel more "intense", but if you can't up your weight, the benefit from the deadlifts will stop quickly... unfortunately.

    In the mean time, I'd suggest trying "Sumo" deadlifts... which is just DL's with a wider stance. This will at least strengthen different areas of your body to some degree. However, I recommend doing all you can to find a way to up your weight so you can really start kicking arse! It's all about adding weight to the bar.

  6. #6
    Frequent Poster whatzhiznutz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iRoCx45s View Post
    Two completely different exercises. Stiff leg's primary muscle is the hams while the DL's primaries are back, glutes and hams.
    Then what do you suggest? Yes this is correct, but secondary muscles are also glutes and lower back. Davebrah has some good points.

  7. #7
    Regular Poster Determination's Avatar
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    You can do deficit deadlifts if your weaker point is the lower portion of the lift. Also you could just do faster reps. For example if you apply the same force to a bar weighing 200 pounds that you would to a bar weighing 300 pounds, the 200 pound bar is going to move a lot faster.
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  8. #8
    M&S Senior Member Skippysje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davebrah View Post
    If you would like to increase your deadflift intensity with limited weight, what you could do is take shorter breaks 30 seconds to 1 minute. Also you can implement rest pause, do as many reps as you can, wait 10 seconds then start again. These will increase hypertrophy. Also dropsetting would work nicely.
    It never occured to me to shorten the rest time, d'oh. Will give 30-45 seconds a try instead of 1 minute. Thanks
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  9. #9
    M&S Senior Member Skippysje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Determination View Post
    You can do deficit deadlifts if your weaker point is the lower portion of the lift. Also you could just do faster reps. For example if you apply the same force to a bar weighing 200 pounds that you would to a bar weighing 300 pounds, the 200 pound bar is going to move a lot faster.
    Seriously?! I wouldn't have thought deads would be the kind of exercise where you would want to be throwing the weight around, especially with the back being involved.
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  10. #10
    Seasoned M&S Veteran Spartigus's Avatar
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  11. #11
    Coming Up The Ranks SnuffSaid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skippysje View Post
    Seriously?! I wouldn't have thought deads would be the kind of exercise where you would want to be throwing the weight around, especially with the back being involved.
    Dynamic effort (submaximal weight with maximal speed) has proved a useful tool for a lot of lifters, but it's only one piece of a larger puzzle. If your training has no maximal effort aspect, progress will be stunted.

    Dynamic effort deadlifts and squats are relatively safe for people who have spent a couple years working on their form.

  12. #12
    M&S Senior Member Skippysje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnuffSaid View Post
    Dynamic effort (submaximal weight with maximal speed) has proved a useful tool for a lot of lifters, but it's only one piece of a larger puzzle. If your training has no maximal effort aspect, progress will be stunted.

    Dynamic effort deadlifts and squats are relatively safe for people who have spent a couple years working on their form.
    I've only been doing deadlifts since the start of the year. But thanks for your advice anyway.
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